Lesson 3 What can be done on an individual/group level

Practice self-care on lunch breaks. Daily lunch breaks are more than just opportunities to eat — they’re also the perfect time to practice self-care. 

  • Practicing self-care during lunch breaks may include:
  • Nurture relationships. Nurturing social connections at work is key to preventing social isolation and loneliness in the workplace.
  • You spend 1/3 of your day with these people! Sure you have something to share except who won the game last night.
  • When we talk about mental health our feelings matter a lot. Our thoughts and feelings influence us, often unconsciously, in everything we do.
  • We want to look at how thoughts and feelings are related and also how physical reactions are linked to this.
  • Talking about thoughts and emotions it is important to mention that mental issues affect and influence our thoughts and feelings.
  • Knowing, analyzing and questioning one’s thoughts and feelings, and then mentioning alternative views if necessary, is a crucial factor in changing one’s thoughts and feelings.
  • It is often a matter of training one’s own perception, perceiving the feeling of fear, for example, and finding a way to deal with it.
  • Physical signals can help you determine how you are feeling. So observe your body reactions: shoulders hunched can be a sign of irritability or anxiety, a heavy body feeling could indicate disappointment or fatigue.
  • sort through the problem, or see it in a new way ·
  • ease built-up tension and gain new insight into a work situation that is causing the problem ·
  • find out that you are not alone, and that other people share your feelings ·
  • with the help of a colleague, identify options or solutions you had not thought before
  • It can encourage your collagues to do the same
  • Complaining about work to our loved one is a common pastime activity for people.
  • HOWEVER, While keeping feelings bottled up isn’t an optimal answer, when we spend what could be quality time with loved ones focused on all the stresses of the day, we lose more of our day to job stress.
  • The more time that we focus on work, the less time we are being mindful and present and enjoying the moment.
  • While expressing our feelings both negative and positive is fundamental and it’s getting a weight off our shoulders, you can also create a burden.
  • Complaining feels cathartic at the time and elevate some of the burden.
  • A challenge for the participants: This week, try to notice how much time you spend complaining about work and see if this is the right amount of time for you.
  • If you find yourself spending non-work hours obsessing over, replaying, or even thinking about the stress that your co-workers bring to your work life, it’s time to assess if this is the best way to spend your time and decide how to stop if you need to.
  • Prepare yourself before you leave
  • Create a Post-Work Ritual
  • Create a Soothing Home Environment for Yourself
  • Make Your Non-Work Time Count
  • Zero tolerance
  • Significant workplace distress is linked to bullying or misuse of power. Bullying can be overt such as physical or verbal aggression or intimidation.
  • It can also be subtle such as making fun of people, excluding people from opportunities or promotion unreasonably, or undermining them. Anyone can bully or be bullied and it can be a difficult issue to establish.
  • Solution: see something say something